Category Archives: Business Planning

QUICKBOOKS REPORTS THAT YOUR BUSINESS SHOULD RUN REGULARLY

qbgraphYou send invoices because you sold products and/or services. Purchase orders go out when you’re running low on inventory, and there are always bills to pay, it seems like. All of this activity is, of course, important in itself, but all of your conscientious bookkeeping culminates in what’s probably the most critical element of QuickBooks: your reports.

Reports can tell you how many navy blue sweatshirts you sold in March, what you paid for health insurance premiums in the first quarter, and how much you bought from your favorite vendor last month. They’re very good at drilling down to get the precise set of numbers you need.

But carefully customized and properly analyzed reports can do more than tell you how many golf clubs to order and when it’s time to switch phone services. They can help you make the business decisions that will help you take your growing company to the next level. There are several that you should be looking at regularly, some of which you can interpret easily and use in your daily workflow. We’ll help you with the interpretation of the more complex financial reports.

Who Owes Money?

That’s probably a question you ask yourself every day. You don’t necessarily have to run the A/R Aging Detail report every day, but you’ll want to run it frequently. It tells you who owes you money and whether they’ve missed the due date (and by how many days).


Figure 1: By running the A/R Aging Detail report, you can see whether you need to follow up with customers who have past due invoices. 

As with any report, you can modify it to include the columns, data set and date range you want by clicking the Customizebutton. When you create a report in a format that you think you might want to run again, click the Memorize button. Enter a name that you’ll remember, and assign it to a Memorized Report Group.

Getting There

There are two ways to find the reports you want to see. You can open the Reports menu and move your cursor down to the category you want, like Customers & Receivables, which will open a slide-out menu of options there.

Or you can open the Report Center, which lets you explore reports in more depth. Each is represented by a small graphic with four icons under it. You can:

  • Run the report with your own data in it
  • Open a small informational window
  • Designate it as a Favorite, and
  • View QuickBooks help.


Figure 2: If you access QuickBooks reports through the Report Center, you’ll have several related options. 

Other accounts receivable reports that you should consult periodically include Open Invoices and Average Days to Pay.

Tracking What You Owe

Reports can also keep you up-to-date on money that you owe to other people and companies. An important one is Unpaid Bills Detail, accessible through the Vendors & Payables menu item. Though you can modify its columns, this report basically tells you who is expecting money from you, the date the bill was issued and its due date, any number assigned to it, the balance due, and relevant aging information.

Vendor Balance Detail is critical, too. This report displays every transaction (invoices, payments, etc.) that contribute to the balance you have with each vendor.

Standard Financial Reports


Figure 3: We hope you’ll let us help you by running and interpreting these standard financial reports. 

QuickBooks report categories include one labeled Company & Financial. These are reports that you can run yourself, but they’re critical for understanding your company’s financial status. We can customize and analyze these for you on a regular basis so you’ll know where you stand. They include:

  • Balance Sheet. What is the value of your company? The balance sheet breaks out this information by account (under the umbrella of assets, liabilities and equity).
  • Income Statement. Often referred to as Profit & Loss, this shows you how much money your business made or lost over a specific time period.
  • Statement of Cash Flows. How much money came in and went out during a specified time range?

Reports can only generate information about what you’ve entered in QuickBooks and exactly where it’s been entered. So it’s crucial that you follow standard accounting practice as you proceed through your daily workflow. As a CPA and Advanced QuickBooks ProAdvisor, I’m available to answer questions that you have about entering your information in QuickBooks and getting the reports that you need to make wise financial decisions. The future success of your business depends upon it.

HAVE A BUDGET FOR YOUR BUSINESS — AND USE IT

operatingbudgetAn annual operating budget captures your firm’s expected revenues and expenses over a 12-month annual period. You can use this year’s financial data as a starting point in putting together a budget for 2015. Then update those figures by getting numbers in advance for as many of your costs as possible and by forecasting your sales. Predicting how the numbers would play out under different assumptions — best case, worst case, and average — can help you to identify potential problems and give you the opportunity to adjust your planning if necessary. Although the word “budget” implies a lack of flexibility because you’re trying to control costs, a budget should be rigid and inflexible. As you monitor your actual results against your budget during the year, you may find that you have to adapt your plan to take advantage of new opportunities or changing economic conditions. If you need help in setting up a budget for your business, please give our office a call today.

IS YOUR BUSINESS PREPARED FOR A DISASTER?

disasterpreparednesssBusinesses can do much to prepare for the impact of the many hazards they face in today’s world including natural hazards like floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and widespread serious illnesses. In addition, hazards include accidents, acts of violence by people and acts of terrorism. Examples of technology-related hazards are the failure or malfunction of systems, equipment or software.  If your business hasn’t get started planning for a possible disaster, now is the time.

There are five steps in developing a disaster preparedness program. These five steps are listed below as well as listed as a checklist of steps to follow for your business.

1. Program Management

o   Organize, develop and administer your preparedness program.

o   Identify regulations that establish minimum requirements for your program.

2. Program Planning

o   Gather information about hazards and assess risks.

o   Conduct a business impact analysis (BIA) of how a disaster would affect your business.

o   Examine ways to prevent hazards and reduce risks.

3. Program Implementation

o   Write a preparedness plan addressing:

o   Resource management.

o   Emergency response.

o   Crisis communications.

o   Business continuity planning.

o   Information technology planning.

o   Employee assistance.

o   Incident management.

o   Training of employees.

4. Program Testing

o   Test and evaluate your plan.

o   Define different types of scenarios that could happen.

o   Learn how to conduct sample exercises for these scenarios.

o   Use exercise results to evaluate the effectiveness of the plan.

5. Program Improvement

o   Identify when the preparedness program needs to be reviewed.

o   Discover methods to evaluate the preparedness program.

o   Utilize the review to make necessary changes and plan improvements.

o  Continually monitor your plan to make changes and improvements as needed.

Source: http://www.sba.gov

If you need help in creating a disaster preparedness plan for your business, please call  your trusted small business advisor today.  We are only a phone call away – (727) 391-7373.