Category Archives: Startup

FIVE BASIC TAX TIPS FOR NEW BUSINESSES

newbusinessIf you start a business, one key to success is to know about your Federal tax obligations. Not only will you probably need to know about income taxes, you may also need to know about payroll taxes as well. Here are five basic tax tips that can help get your business off to a good start.

1. Business Structure. As you start out, you’ll need to choose the structure of your business. Some common types include sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. You may also choose to be an S corporation or taxed as a Limited Liability Company. You’ll report your business activity using the IRS forms which are right for your business type.

2. Business Taxes. There are four general types of business taxes. They are income tax, self-employment tax, employment tax and excise tax. The type of taxes your business pays usually depends on which type of business you choose to set up. You may need to pay your taxes by making estimated tax payments.

3. Employer Identification Number. You may need to get an EIN for federal tax purposes. Give us a call to find out if you need this number. If you do need one, we are available to guide you through the process of applying for it online.

4. Accounting Method. An accounting method is a set of rules that determine when to report income and expenses. Your business must use a consistent method. The two that are most common are the cash method and the accrual method. Under the cash method, you normally report income in the year that you receive it and deduct expenses in the year that you pay them. Under the accrual method, you generally report income in the year that you earn it and deduct expenses in the year that you incur them. This is true even if you receive the income or pay the expenses in a future year.

5. Employee Health Care. The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit helps small businesses and tax-exempt organizations pay for health care coverage they offer their employees. A small employer is eligible for the credit if it has fewer than 25 employees who work full-time, or a combination of full-time and part-time. Beginning in 2014, the maximum credit is 50 percent of premiums paid for small business employers and 35 percent of premiums paid for small tax-exempt employers, such as charities.

For 2015 and after, employers employing at least a certain number of employees (generally 50 full-time employees or a combination of full-time and part-time employees that is equivalent to 50 full-time employees) will be subject to the Employer Shared Responsibility provision.

Have a business idea? Call us first. We’ll make sure you have everything in place to make your new business a successful one.

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FIVE BASIC TAX TIPS FOR NEW BUSINESSES

business-owner-stockxpertcom_id17260461_jpg_9d244c0f32209ba041e058fccd912e101If you start a business, one key to success is to know about your Federal tax obligations. You may need to know not only about income taxes but also about payroll taxes. Here are five basic tax tips that can help get your business off to a good start.

1. Business Structure.  As you start out, you’ll need to choose the structure of your business. Some common types include sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. You may also choose to be an S corporation or Limited Liability Company (LLC). You’ll report your business activity using the IRS forms which are right for your business type.

2. Business Taxes.  There are four general types of business taxes. They are income tax, self-employment tax, employment tax and excise tax. The type of taxes your business pays usually depends on which type of business you choose to set up. You may need to pay your taxes by making estimated tax payments.

3. Employer Identification Number.  You may need to get an EIN for federal tax purposes. Search “do you need an EIN” on IRS.gov to find out if you need this number. If you do need one, you can apply for it online.

4. Accounting Method.  An accounting method is a set of rules that determine when to report income and expenses. Your business must use a consistent method. The two that are most common are the cash method and the accrual method. Under the cash method, you normally report income in the year that you receive it and deduct expenses in the year that you pay them. Under the accrual method, you generally report income in the year that you earn it and deduct expenses in the year that you incur them. This is true even if you receive the income or pay the expenses in a future year.

5. Employee Health Care.  The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit helps small businesses and tax-exempt organizations pay for health care coverage they offer their employees. A small employer is eligible for the credit if it has fewer than 25 employees who work full-time, or a combination of full-time and part-time. Beginning in 2014, the maximum credit is 50 percent of premiums paid for small business employers and 35 percent of premiums paid for small tax-exempt employers, such as charities.

For 2015 and after, employers employing at least a certain number of employees (generally 50 full-time employees or a combination of full-time and part-time employees that is equivalent to 50 full-time employees) will be subject to the Employer Shared Responsibility provision.

If you would like to start a new business or have questions about starting up a new business, please call our office today. We specialize in helping people just like you who want to enjoy the freedom and flexibility of owning their own businesses.

Source: IRS Summertime Tax Tip 2014-09

SHOULD YOU BUY A NEW TOP-LEVEL DOMAIN NAME FOR YOUR BUSINESS?

domainNow it’s easier than ever before to buy a branded URL for your business. With the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers’ rollout of more than 1,400 themed domain extensions over the course of the year, you can now buy the website address of your choice with a .bike, .coffee, or .lawyer top-level domain, to name just a few of the options.

If the .com website address of your choice isn’t available, a themed domain extension may seem like an attractive option — but is it worth building your online brand around it? Consider the following points.

.Com Domains Still Dominate

There are more than 100 million registered .com domains, according to statistics from VeriSign, which far exceeds the use of any other domain extension. On a practical level, that means most people will default to including “.com” when typing in your URL unless you make a major branding effort to get customers to remember your custom domain.

What if You Can’t Find a .Com Domain That Suits Your Brand?

Domain names ending in .com are generally preferable, but what if your top choice — or even your tenth choice — isn’t available? That’s a common occurrence for small-business owners. In a study conducted by  Wakefield Research, 55 percent of respondents surveyed said they believe  they have lost business because of their domain names. If a suitable .com URL isn’t available, it may make sense to move to a themed top-level domain. For instance, if you own a business called Sunrise Coffee and can’t purchase sunrisecoffee.com or any suitable variants, consider purchasing sunrise.coffee instead.

You May Need to Buy More Than One Domain Name

Many businesses strive to protect their brand by purchasing numerous relevant domain names. But with the new business-themed domains, this can get quite expensive. If you own a chain of coffee shops, for instance, you may want to purchase a .com, a .biz, and now, even a .coffee domain name. ICANN has launched a trademark clearinghouse that allows brands to protect their trademarked names, with trademark registration available for between $95 and $150 per year. Keep in mind that this service sends a warning to those who purchase trademarked domain names, but it does not actually prevent anyone from buying them. To fully protect your brand, you’ll need to actually purchase the relevant domain names.

If you want to check on the costs and availability of brand-related domain names, a service like GoDaddy can help at no charge. If you haven’t even decided on a business name yet, try Panabee, which can help you come up with potential choices for a business name.

Written by Kathryn Hawkins, Intuit Small Business Blog, 7/17/2014

Read more: http://blog.intuit.com/marketing/should-you-buy-a-new-top-level-domain-name-for-your-business/#ixzz37jEVj1oR

CLOSING YOUR BOOKS ON THE FIRST HALF OF 2014: NOW WHAT?

closingthebooksJune 30 is the end of the second quarter in 2014 for most small businesses that operate on a calendar year; July 1 starts the third quarter. Now is the time to assess your results year to date, reassess your projections for the remainder of the year, and put your plans into action.

Assessing results
Has the first half of the year been profitable, or as profitable as you’d hoped? The only way to know is to review your revenue and expenses to date. Compare the results with your expectations from your business plan. What the results mean:

  • If you hit your target, congratulations! You’ve obviously got a good handle on your sales, and expenses haven’t exceeded your budget.
  • If you exceeded your target, determine the reason or reasons why. You must be doing something right and you need to identity this so you can capitalize on it going forward. Did new marketing efforts pay off? Did you implement new technology that significantly cut costs?
  • If you fell short of your target, determine the reason or reasons why. Was revenue too low? Were expenses too high? Did you experience an unusual event, such as a catastrophic storm?

Projecting revenues and expenses
Take the lessons you’ve learned from your assessment, couple that with expectations about customers and expenses, and devise new projections for the balance of the year (or longer).

  • Revenue side. What are you doing to retain customers? Find new customers? Are you seeing any changes in customer buying habits? Quantify your revenue projections based on what you know about your customers specifically and the market in general.
  • Expense side. Look at your expense budget to uncover potential cost increases. For example, if your current health plan is up for renewal, find out if possible what the new premiums will be. This will help you decide what to do about health coverage in light of the new cost and the rules under the Affordable Care Act.

Actions to take
Planning is not merely a cerebral activity. There are actions you can take now:

  • Update your business plan. If you don’t have a formal plan, consider creating one (even if it’s only one page). This will serve as a roadmap that you can follow in the coming months to try to meet your projections. It will also serve as a benchmark against which to assess your efforts at the end of the year. The business plan includes your budget (a discussion of which follows), your marketing efforts, strategic planning, and more.
  • Review your budget. As part of your business planning, you’ll need to check your pricing and see whether changes are warranted. If you’ve experienced price increases in your monthly expenses, you may want to pass on some or all of this to customers; your margin can handle only so much. Also look over your expenses to see where changes can be made. Take advantage of technology to trim expenses (e.g., use videoconferencing instead of traveling distances to customers and clients).
  • Meet with your tax advisor. Now is likely a slow time for CPAs and a great time to meet with yours to discuss tax issues for you and your business. Make sure you’re taking advantage of opportunities that can reduce your tax payments and implement best practices for your company.

Conclusion
You can’t run a business by crossing your fingers and hoping for the best. Realistic planning and follow-up will go a long way in helping you to grow your business, handle disruptions, and achieve your dream.

Written By: Barbara Weltman, Big Ideas For Small Business

Source: http://www.barbaraweltman.com/articles/financial/financial_article_details.asp?id=268

TEN PERSONALITY TRAITS THAT EVERY SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEUR HAS

Whether I’m out on the speaking circuit, working with startups, back in Ann Arbor teaching MBAs, or just socializing in a coffee shop, I’d say there’s one question I’m hit with more than any other.

It comes in different forms, but the essence of the question is the same: “What does it take to be a successful entrepreneur?”

Over the years, my answer has evolved. But I’ve found myself settling on ten traits that are shared in common by virtually every truly successful entrepreneur I’ve met, observed or studied. The true rock stars are all:

1. Passionate

You need to be driven by a clear sense of purpose and passion. Typically, that passion comes from one of two sources: the topic of the business, or the game of business-building itself.

Why do you need passion? Simply because you’re likely to be working too hard, for too long, for too little pay with no guarantee that it’ll work out… so you need to be motivated by something intrinsic and not money-related.

2. Resilient

If you’re going to build a startup, you’ll need a spirit of determination coupled with a high pain tolerance. You’ll need to be willing and able to learn from your mistakes – to get knocked down repeatedly, get up, dust yourself off, and move forward with renewed motivation.

People will constantly tell you your baby’s ugly, that your business won’t work. Now, you should listen carefully and be open to constructive criticism. But after a while, having the door slammed in your face repeatedly can be withering, and the best entrepreneurs learn to feed off the negativity and actually gain strength from it.

3. Self-Possessed

You need a strong sense of self. You can’t be threatened by being surrounded by talented, driven people. To truly succeed, you’ll need the self-confidence to surround yourself with people “who don’t look like you”… that is, people with skills, background and domain knowledge that complement your own. And check your ego at the door: you shouldn’t be too proud to make coffee for the team, empty the waste baskets, or do the bank runs.

4. Decisive

You’ll need to develop a comfort-level with uncertainly and ambiguity. Entrepreneurs gather as much information as they can in a short period of time, and then MOVE, MOVE, MOVE!! The attitude is that it’s not going to be perfect… We only have 9% or so of the data from which to base our decision… but if we wait to have all the information, we’ll never get moving… and be mired in indecision. (Big organizations are really good at this – the mired thing – saying, We don’t have enough information, so let’s continue to study… form a committee or a task force)

5. Fearless

On the sliding scale from “risk-averse” to “risk-seeking,” it shouldn’t surprise anyone that entrepreneurs tend to be closer to the latter. But you don’t need to be a nut-case, the sort who bungee-jumps without a helmet. Smart entrepreneurs develop an intuitive ability to sniff out and mitigate startup business risk. But you know you’re going to fall down, and feel comfortable with that fact and that you’re going to learn from your failures and adjust as you go.

6. Financially Prepared

You’ll need the right personal financial profile to make the leap. This doesn’t mean that only the rich can be entrepreneurs. But unless and until you’ve got the personal financial ‘runway’ (ability to go without a steady paycheck and subsidized benefits) of at least 18 to 24 months (ideally longer), you might hold off on quitting your day job.

Consider launching the startup as a side-business if that’s possible, while continuing to work the 8-to-5 shift to cover the bills. Or approach your boss about going part-time. Then, once your business generating cash flow, you can dial back on your hours, or submit your resignation and go full-time with your startup.

7. Flexible

I challenge you to find an entrepreneur running a startup four or more years old where that business doesn’t differ dramatically from the vision sketched out in their original business plan. The point is that the folks who stay on their feet are the ones who stay flexible and adjust to new information and changing circumstances.

8. Zoom Lens-Equipped

Can you ‘pan out’ to see a compelling big vision for your business, then ‘zoom in’ and focus on near-term startup goals? Successful entrepreneurs can facilely move back and forth between these two views. They’re able to articulate the big picture, while simultaneously managing and executing to the ‘zoom-in’ picture.

9. Able to Sell

Whether you’re a born extrovert or introvert, as a founder/CEO, you’ll find yourself always selling. You’ll be selling your vision to prospective partners and funding sources. You’ll be selling prospective recruits on why they should quit their day jobs and join this startup they’ve never heard of. You’ll be selling your products and services (yes, you’ll probably be personally closing at least the first few sales). You’ll be selling your employees on why they should remain calm and stay with the ship when the seas inevitably get rough.

10. Balanced

You may not start out with a fool-proof gyroscope, but to survive as an entrepreneur, you’ll need that strong sense of perspective. How to maintain simple, clear focus. How to be at peace with, and learn from, a failure. Understanding that not all battles are worth winning, and when to walk away. Knowing that most in your startup aren’t as entrepreneurial as you – that this may be a very cool job for them, but it’s still a job. Knowing when to go home and give your loved ones a hug. When to go for a run.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/traits-of-successful-entrepreneurs-2013-2#ixzz31YB56K6V

If you are curious about whether you have these personality traits for entrepreneurship, please visit us at http://www.LStortzCPA.com

 

 

 

CASHING IN ON SMALL BUSINESS OPTIMISM

small business openFor the first time in five years, small-business owners are feeling more optimistic about their prospects, according to the recently released Wells Fargo/Gallup Small Business Index. Specifically, the index rose 21 points for the first quarter of 2014 to +45, which is the highest it’s been since the third quarter of 2008. The results are based on a January survey of 603 U.S. small-business owners.

Much of the increase in optimism has to do with the general improvement of the economy as a whole. The complete survey results [PDF] show that specific triggers of the shift include better access to credit, anticipated increases in revenue and staffing, and improved cash flow.

Of course, small-business owners continue to face some very real challenges: According to the Index, 21 percent of those surveyed say generating new business is currently their biggest hurdle. Other obstacles include government regulations, hiring, and health care.

Make Hay While the Sun Shines

If you’re feeling optimistic about the future, why not seize the opportunity to invest in your business? Here are four ways to do just that.

1. Make renovations. If you’ve been putting off major renovations to your office or another essential aspect of your small business, now is the time to seriously consider an upgrade. Set aside time to crunch the numbers to determine whether the investment is feasible. Building renovations often result in improved conditions for your employees, which can be a good way toincrease loyalty over time.

2. Update your technology. If your software is outdated, update it. End of story. Yes, it costs money, but if you have a bit extra in the kitty right now, use it. Obsolete software leaves your company computers more vulnerable to hackers and viruses, the damage from which can be even more costly to repair.

3. Hire additional staff. If your employees have been running ragged to keep up with the tasks assigned to them due to previous budget cuts, now is the time to consider loosening the purse strings a bit. Bringing on new staff can reduce workplace stress and enable each employee to do the best job possible.

4. Advance your skill set. If you’ve been putting off training for financial reasons, you don’t need to hold back anymore. Go ahead and pay for courses or seminars. Or, invest in training for your employees to advance their skill sets as well. The more you all know, the better prepared you’ll be to overcome the specific challenges of your industry.

Read more: http://blog.intuit.com/trends/cashing-in-on-small-business-optimism/#ixzz2zzsBIYGx

If you have questions about small business optimism, please  call your “trusted small business advisor” today.  We are only a phone call away – (727) 391-7373.

 

TEN TIPS FOR RUNNING A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS

1. Determine the type of business entity in which you will conduct your business. The major choices include: sole proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company or LLC, C corporation, S corporation, and not-for-profit organization.

2. Apply for your Federal Tax Identification number with the IRS.

3. Establish a separate bank account for your business.

4. Set up a business accounting system for your business. There are several to choose from but we recommed QuickBooks Pro software to meet your small business accounting, payroll, and financial reporting needs.  As an Advanced Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor, we can help set this program up for you, train you on how to use it, and help you troubleshoot problems.

5. Set up the forms that you’ll need to track transactions such as invoices, purchase orders, estimates, and statements. These can be set up in QuickBooks Pro.

6. Check to make sure that you have all of the business licenses that you need.

7. Purchase business insurance to protect your financial investment.

8. Market your business through referrals, a website, social media, Internet advertising, and networking events.

9. Make quarterly estimated tax payments to the IRS throughout the year, especially if your business is a sole proprietorship, partnership, or an S corporation.

10. Value your time. Spend as much time as possible working “on” the business and not “in” the business.  Delegate and outsource tasks to experts and to your staff.

Linda A. Stortz, CPA, P.A. is a local CPA firm in Seminole, FL that provides accounting and QuickBooks solutions, tax return preparation services, and business advisory services to small businesses in the Tampa Bay, FL area. The firm specializes in advising small business owners to run a successful business. To find out more about our business services, please call us today at (727) 391-7373.